Triples Alley – Forgetting Nostalgia – Album Review

Emerging from the San Francisco East Bay punk/hardcore scene is a pop-punk band, Triples Alley, who aim to make aggressive music with catchy melodies that are a must for the ever-growing pop-punk music scene. Each of the band members all brings their own music background into the mix, coming from punk, hardcore, indie pop, metal and death metal, which can be heard in a few of their songs. Their debut E.P Forgetting Nostalgia, features seven songs, all carrying the distinct pop-punk vocals, heavy and aggressive guitars, as well as the strong beat of the drums, which is a known feature of this genre. The songs on this album tend to interconnect with others in their messages, which brings a story into the album.

The first track on the album “Open Season,” is about the regrets that one keeps as well as the secrets that they hide. It talks about how once you do something, there is no way that you can change it because what’s done is done. The idea of having skeletons in your closet is brought into this song with the lyric of “These bones are piling in your closet.” In the song, they talk about how once you either come to terms with things or learn to let them go, that you will feel a weight lift off of you. This song is very pop-punk based with the fast paced beat, and the vocals which are leveled just above the guitars.

The second track, “Looking Back,” relates the title to the message quite well as the song is about staying in the same place and trying to fix the issues that arose, but that there is no way that you can just “turn back the hands of time” and try to restart it all. This song goes through being at the same place and realizing that it just might not work out and that it was never meant to be. This song features the vocals behind the guitars at certain points which really brings on the pop-punk harshness that is quite common in the genre.

Cut From The Same,” is quite upbeat and is about trying to start something over and retracing steps so that the rest of your days aren’t wasted. “The world won’t wait,” is one of the lyrics that stand out the most, but also the song speaks of how everyone is just human and they make mistakes and that shouldn’t be judged because it is their life. It comes down to being a human and knowing that you make a mistake and that you are willing to try to restart and make things better. This song has a very steady pace and the vocals are once again leveled equally with the guitars.

The fourth track, “Self Destruct,” has a very steady beat throughout with the vocals being behind the guitars a bit, which allows the pop-punk feeling to get in the ear of the listener. This song is about needing to do something with your life and not just letting it go to waste. They repeat the idea of how you will never know until you try something and that once you give up, it is hard to go back so you should always take the chance. This message has been seen before in pop-punk music, but they have taken a different refreshing angle with it.

Track number five on the album is “Runaway,” a song all about taking control over your life and moving forward rather than staying behind when everything else is changing. Sometimes in order to figure out what needs to be done, you have to start a new path and leave, thus the title of ‘runaway’. The lyric of, “You don’t know whats right, whats right or wrong,” allows for the listener to see that they are the only ones who truly know what is best for them. This song holds a steady beat throughout, and the beginning has a fade intro with a strong build, which enhances the beat of the first verse.

Not Giving Up (Good Enough),” leads with isolated vocals that move into a strong steady build with heavy guitars. Everyone knows that life is hard and that things get tough and that is exactly what this song is about. Knowing that mistakes have been made, but that it is not a problem for anyone else to deal with, and that there is no reason to be judged for choices made, is what this song conveys. This song also talks about a relationship where the person needs a friend and that they won’t give up on them no matter what. This song ends with a classic catchphrase from Curb Your Enthusiasm that Larry David is known to say; “It’s pretty good. It’s pretty pretty pretty pretty good.

The final song on the EP is “Vulture,” which really shows the influence of the heavier musical background that some of the band members possess. This song is filled with standout lyrics such as, “Words like daggers, cut like razors,” and “Honesty is hard in a world full of lies.” This song goes deep into the idea of how things change very quickly, and sometimes the people whom you called friends, leave you alone and act like complete strangers. It talks about how after that happens, that there is really no way to change things or go back, but as long as you try and put your heart into something, no one can say that you didn’t try. The song ends with the idea of how change can sometimes be the best thing, even if you can’t see it at the time. The song fades out with a steady drum beat that follows with the heavy beat of the song.

This debut EP from San Francisco pop-punk band Triples Alley was recorded with Donald Scully and has proved to show off the band’s talent, as well as their songwriting skills. This album carries strong messages that everyone can relate to, and what will draw many fans to them. This band will have a bright future if they continue to express their true emotions in their songs and amp up the volume with their multiple musical backgrounds.

Official Lyric Video for  “Cut From The Same

Rock On

Alyssa (Rolling Music Reviews)

Advertisements

One thought on “Triples Alley – Forgetting Nostalgia – Album Review

Tell Me Your Thoughts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s